Is King’s dream dead or alive in 2016?

January 14, 2016 in News

By Janice K. Neal-Vincent Contributing Writer Since its 1954 origin the Civil Rights Movement frequently visits and rests upon America’s conscience. Equally, the rise of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther […]

Alcorn announces Medgar Wiley Evers memorial statue dedication

April 25, 2013 in Education, Events, News, Statewide News, Top Stories

Medgar Wiley Evers had big dreams when he arrived on the campus of Alcorn A&M College in the summer of 1948.  It is likely that those dreams involved becoming an All-American football player, participating in campus activities, and ultimately earning a college degree.  It is hard to imagine that his dreams were enormous enough to predict the phenomenal impact his life and legacy would have on the United States and the world.

Yet, half a century after his untimely demise, thousands of Americans will journey to Mississippi to commemorate one of the foremost leaders in American civil rights history. 

Ole Miss trailblazer, James Meredith to receive Harvard award

April 12, 2013 in Top Stories

Dean Kathleen McCartney has announced that Civil Rights activist, author, and political adviser James Meredith will receive the Harvard Graduate School of Education Medal for Education Impact, the highest honor given by the school, and speak at the 2013 Convocationceremony on May 29.

“Just over 50 years ago, Mr. Meredith walked through the doors of the University of Mississippi, becoming the first African American to enroll in the previously segregated school. In doing so, he forced America to look in the mirror and become a better nation. Fifty years later, he is still working to address inequality in America’s schools,” McCartney said. “At HGSE we know that education is a civil right. James Meredith endured beatings and bullets to fight for that right. His courage and determination cannot be overstated. Today, we all walk in his footsteps and through the doors he opened.”

According to Meredith, the award will be the first he has accepted in 50 years.

Emmett Till director speaks out against offensive Lil Wayne lyric

March 18, 2013 in Top Stories

It’s been weeks since the backlash began over a vulgar lyric used by rap superstar Lil Wayne in one of his songs referencing murdered Chicago teen Emmett Till. And while many have spoken out against the Grammy-winning, multi-platinum artist, Wayne himself, whose real name is Dwayne Michael Carter Jr., remains mum on the subject.

In fact, Wayne is said to be “resting comfortably” two days after suffering a seizure that sent him to a Los Angeles hospital this weekend and falsely triggered media reports that he was near death.

But many remain unnerved that Wayne, a 30-year-old black man, could be so callous when it comes to the still emotionally charged story of Emmett Till.

“Back in the Day” month long presentations at New Hope Baptist Church bring history to life

March 7, 2013 in Top Stories

By Joy Brashears

and Ayesha K. Mustafaa

Special to The Mississippi Link

On Thursday, Feb. 28, New Hope Baptist Church culminated its month long celebration of Black History month, themed “Back in the Day,” with a tribute to Medgar Wiley Evers. Mrs. Myrlie Evers-Williams also was honored. Dr. Tonya Moore, the niece of Medgar, was the moderator.

Giving remarks were Medgar’s daughter Reena Evers-Everette and his brother Charles Evers. The children of New Hope brightened the program with their lively performances, including the song “Kum Ba Yah.”….

Dr. King celebration not a day off but a day to reflect

January 10, 2013 in News, Top Stories

By Ayesha K. Mustafaa

Editor

As a national holiday, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is celebrated every year on the third Monday of January; his actual birthday is Jan. 15. While federal offices, banks, schools and businesses close out of respect for Dr. King’s leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, many have plans to take this not as a day off but as a time to reflect on the principles he espoused and on what needs to be done to complete his dream….

Memorials planned for civil rights activist Lawrence Guyot

December 7, 2012 in Education, News, Obituaries, Statewide News, Top Stories

Lawrence Guyot didn’t have to read about the civil rights movement.

He lived it.

In fact, his memories of the trials and tribulations of the civil rights struggle were so vivid, he constantly shared them with others – including children – so they could understand what the fight was really about.

Statue honoring Fannie Lou Hamer to be unveiled Friday in Ruleville

October 4, 2012 in Events, News, Statewide News, Top Stories

The Fannie Lou Hamer Statue Committee and Hanlon Sculpture Studio plans to unveil a statue of Civil Rights Leader and Human Rights Advocate Fannie Lou Hamer on Oct. 5, 2012 at the Fannie Lou Hamer Memorial Garden in Ruleville.

Dr. Patricia Reid-Merritt, Distinguished Professor of Social Work and Africana Studies at the Richard Stockton College of NJ and Chair of the National Committee expressed her appreciation to committee members and Hanlon Sculpture Studio for their commitment and dedication to the completion of the project.