NISSAN expands its commitment to Mississippi’s HBCUs

April 20, 2017 in News

By Othor Cain

Editor

Presidents and other leaders of Mississippi HBCUs receive $250,000 donation from NISSAN officials in Canton. photos by kevin bradley

Presidents and other leaders of Mississippi HBCUs receive $250,000 donation from NISSAN officials in Canton. photos by kevin bradley

1 IMG_1527Since 2003 Nissan has invested more than $1M to area black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in Mississippi. Wednesday, that figure increased by $250,000 with a check presentation to seven schools.

For the third year in a row, Nissan has made this investment to promote science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) initiatives at each school to inspire and develop talent.

“We are preparing the workforce for the future,” said Steve March, vice president of Manufacturing at Nissan Canton Vehicle Assembly Plant.

“Thanks to the cooperation we have with these colleges, we can continue to grow future engineers and scientists who come and work in this facility and other industries…so its a pretty big day for us.”

At Nissan’s Canton Assembly Plant, Nissan executives presented donations to representatives from Alcorn State University, Coahoma Community College, Jackson State University, Mississippi Valley State University, Rust College, Tougaloo College and first time awardee Hinds Community College-Utica Campus.

“We have recognized for three years Nissan’s investment in STEM fields at these schools…we are doing some amazing things on our campus in these areas as well,” said an excited Debra Mays Jackson, vice president for the Utica and Vicksburg-Warren campuses of Hinds Community College.

“We are honored to be a first time awardee and look forward to a continued relationship.” “Nissan recognizes that STEM education is critical to developing the next generation of innovators,” said Jeffrey Webster, director of Diversity and Inclusion, Nissan North America.

“We are proud to continue our commitment to Mississippi’s HBCUs with another $250,000 grant this year.”

Resources provided to each institution will be used to promote a range of STEM-related programs and departments, including applied sciences, engineering, math, computer and information science and many more.