Delta Sigma Sorority spotlights success stories

February 28, 2013 in Top Stories

Fourteen black Jackson achievers earn awards 

By Dr. Jerry Komia Domatob

Special to The Mississippi Link

Like celebrities, fourteen black men majestically strolled on a red carpet amidst booming praise, and received  shinny white plaques for leadership and community service at the glitzy Delta Sigma Sorority Beacons and Blaze Honors and Black Gala, Saturday, February 23.

Held at the spacious Wahabi Shrine Temple in Jackson, the event attracted a grand concourse of families and friends, with the Clinton (MS) Delta Alumnae Chapter serving as hosts.

Honorees included business entrepreneurs, educators, religious, health, and academic leaders. Among them were: Lee Rodgers Bush, Dr. John D. Calhoun, Atty. Ottowa E. Carter Jr., Chamber of Commerce Chairman Socrates Garrett, Lieutenant Colonel Rodney Harris, Tim Craig Lee, Sam Minter, Dr. Paul Mobit, Damiam Muriel,  John Neal, Dr. Dion F. Porter, Atty. Tom Stingley, Johnnie Terry and Johnny Earl Wilson Jr.

Chapter president Laurie Smith Lawson said, “This year, we honor fourteen African American males who have made public service contributions to the community in various ways, reflecting the sororities five point program thrust.”

Michael Adrain Davis, emcee for the evening, introduced the 2013 Beacons and Blaze honorees.

Prayers, music, delicious food and dancing highlighted the event. Deltas from neighboring towns and communities came out in full force for the event.

Founded in 1913, one hundred years ago by Howard University students, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Sorority promotes academic excellence, supports the underserved, educates the public on issues and tackles social problems in communities.

Dr. Elayne H. Anthony and Dr. Laurie Smith Lawson, who served as the special

program chair and president respectively, along with their team, organized the event. It was an occasion many will cherish for a long time to come for the warmth, cheerfulness, and above all, the larger than life significance.